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Wines From Apples, Plums, Even Tomatoes, but no Grapes

Wines From Apples, Plums, Even Tomatoes, but no Grapes


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Visitors to Connecticut's Staehly Farm are often stumped by the winery's most unusual wine. Is that a taste of cantaloupe? Is there some grapefruit in there? Where does it get all that acidity?

The wine's name, Pomodoro, drops a clue. Yes, it's a tomato-based wine, an Old World-style family recipe. Tasting notes describe it as rich and robust, with flavors of apricot and smoky bacon, and its distinctive makeup earned it a double gold medal in the 2016 Big E Northeast Gold Wine Competition.

"I think I had 1 in 100 [tasters] who could place it as tomato," said Kevin Staehly, who operates the farm winery with his parents, Christopher and Gail.

"I think it's either love or hate; you won't be in-between," his father says.

The Staehly property got its start as a Christmas tree farm in 1985 (its history is honored in the winery's logo of a tree with an "S" initial in its center) and now boasts 15 acres of choose-and-cut trees. The business expanded with greenhouses in 2001 and its farm stand building in 2005, growing to become Staehly Tree Farm and Gardens. Visitors stop by to buy seasonal fresh produce, jellies and jams, pies, local cheese and eggs.

The idea for the winery, incidentally, came several years ago from Phil Markowski of Two Roads Brewing in Stratford, says Kevin Staehly. Markowski was harvesting Staehly Farm's sour cherries for the brewery's kriek lambic-style beer, and asked Christopher Staehly if he'd ever considered making wine.

"My father said, 'We've explored planting grapes, but we didn't really think it was for us,'" Kevin says. "He said, 'No, I mean with the fruit you've got here.' And that was kind of the catalyst that set things into motion."

To read more about Staehly Farm and its unusual array of wines, visit the Hartford Courant.


Sangria is a type of alcoholic punch originating in Portugal and Spain. It most commonly contains some mixture of red wine, chopped fruit, liquor, fruit juice, and sparkling water that is served chilled. But the best part about sangria is there&aposs no one right way to do it. The combinations are truly endless. We&aposll teach you how to make the more traditional red wine version, but we&aposll also give you some fun sangria variation ideas.

1. Wine

Wine is the basis for this summertime punch, so choose one that you would enjoy on its own, but don&apost choose one that&aposs too expensive. Sangria is the perfect way to dress up a bottle of cheap wine.

For a Spanish red wine sangria you&aposll want to choose a wine that&aposs fruity and not too acidic. Some good options include: Garnacha, Rioja, Pinot Noir, Malbec, or Merlot. Avoid high-tannin wines like Cabernet Sauvignon.

2. Fruit

Fruit is not only going to add fresh summer flavor to your sangria, but it&aposs also going to make for a beautiful presentation in your pitcher or punch bowl. That means you&aposll want to choose sturdy fruits that will last a while without disintegrating. Some good options include: oranges, apples, strawberries, peaches, pineapple, pears, and lemons.

3. Spirits

If you&aposre looking to make your sangria a true cocktail, you&aposll of course need to add liquor. Brandy is the most popular choice, but some also use fruit schnapps, rum, or cognac. You can also lower the alcohol content by diluting the sangria with some club soda, or skipping the liquor all together.

4. Sweetener

To round it all out, you can use a sweetener. Some may choose to forego this step, it simply comes down to personal preference. Natural sweeteners like maple syrup, sugar, agave nectar, or simple syrup do best at balancing out sangria without over-sweetening.


Sangria is a type of alcoholic punch originating in Portugal and Spain. It most commonly contains some mixture of red wine, chopped fruit, liquor, fruit juice, and sparkling water that is served chilled. But the best part about sangria is there&aposs no one right way to do it. The combinations are truly endless. We&aposll teach you how to make the more traditional red wine version, but we&aposll also give you some fun sangria variation ideas.

1. Wine

Wine is the basis for this summertime punch, so choose one that you would enjoy on its own, but don&apost choose one that&aposs too expensive. Sangria is the perfect way to dress up a bottle of cheap wine.

For a Spanish red wine sangria you&aposll want to choose a wine that&aposs fruity and not too acidic. Some good options include: Garnacha, Rioja, Pinot Noir, Malbec, or Merlot. Avoid high-tannin wines like Cabernet Sauvignon.

2. Fruit

Fruit is not only going to add fresh summer flavor to your sangria, but it&aposs also going to make for a beautiful presentation in your pitcher or punch bowl. That means you&aposll want to choose sturdy fruits that will last a while without disintegrating. Some good options include: oranges, apples, strawberries, peaches, pineapple, pears, and lemons.

3. Spirits

If you&aposre looking to make your sangria a true cocktail, you&aposll of course need to add liquor. Brandy is the most popular choice, but some also use fruit schnapps, rum, or cognac. You can also lower the alcohol content by diluting the sangria with some club soda, or skipping the liquor all together.

4. Sweetener

To round it all out, you can use a sweetener. Some may choose to forego this step, it simply comes down to personal preference. Natural sweeteners like maple syrup, sugar, agave nectar, or simple syrup do best at balancing out sangria without over-sweetening.


Sangria is a type of alcoholic punch originating in Portugal and Spain. It most commonly contains some mixture of red wine, chopped fruit, liquor, fruit juice, and sparkling water that is served chilled. But the best part about sangria is there&aposs no one right way to do it. The combinations are truly endless. We&aposll teach you how to make the more traditional red wine version, but we&aposll also give you some fun sangria variation ideas.

1. Wine

Wine is the basis for this summertime punch, so choose one that you would enjoy on its own, but don&apost choose one that&aposs too expensive. Sangria is the perfect way to dress up a bottle of cheap wine.

For a Spanish red wine sangria you&aposll want to choose a wine that&aposs fruity and not too acidic. Some good options include: Garnacha, Rioja, Pinot Noir, Malbec, or Merlot. Avoid high-tannin wines like Cabernet Sauvignon.

2. Fruit

Fruit is not only going to add fresh summer flavor to your sangria, but it&aposs also going to make for a beautiful presentation in your pitcher or punch bowl. That means you&aposll want to choose sturdy fruits that will last a while without disintegrating. Some good options include: oranges, apples, strawberries, peaches, pineapple, pears, and lemons.

3. Spirits

If you&aposre looking to make your sangria a true cocktail, you&aposll of course need to add liquor. Brandy is the most popular choice, but some also use fruit schnapps, rum, or cognac. You can also lower the alcohol content by diluting the sangria with some club soda, or skipping the liquor all together.

4. Sweetener

To round it all out, you can use a sweetener. Some may choose to forego this step, it simply comes down to personal preference. Natural sweeteners like maple syrup, sugar, agave nectar, or simple syrup do best at balancing out sangria without over-sweetening.


Sangria is a type of alcoholic punch originating in Portugal and Spain. It most commonly contains some mixture of red wine, chopped fruit, liquor, fruit juice, and sparkling water that is served chilled. But the best part about sangria is there&aposs no one right way to do it. The combinations are truly endless. We&aposll teach you how to make the more traditional red wine version, but we&aposll also give you some fun sangria variation ideas.

1. Wine

Wine is the basis for this summertime punch, so choose one that you would enjoy on its own, but don&apost choose one that&aposs too expensive. Sangria is the perfect way to dress up a bottle of cheap wine.

For a Spanish red wine sangria you&aposll want to choose a wine that&aposs fruity and not too acidic. Some good options include: Garnacha, Rioja, Pinot Noir, Malbec, or Merlot. Avoid high-tannin wines like Cabernet Sauvignon.

2. Fruit

Fruit is not only going to add fresh summer flavor to your sangria, but it&aposs also going to make for a beautiful presentation in your pitcher or punch bowl. That means you&aposll want to choose sturdy fruits that will last a while without disintegrating. Some good options include: oranges, apples, strawberries, peaches, pineapple, pears, and lemons.

3. Spirits

If you&aposre looking to make your sangria a true cocktail, you&aposll of course need to add liquor. Brandy is the most popular choice, but some also use fruit schnapps, rum, or cognac. You can also lower the alcohol content by diluting the sangria with some club soda, or skipping the liquor all together.

4. Sweetener

To round it all out, you can use a sweetener. Some may choose to forego this step, it simply comes down to personal preference. Natural sweeteners like maple syrup, sugar, agave nectar, or simple syrup do best at balancing out sangria without over-sweetening.


Sangria is a type of alcoholic punch originating in Portugal and Spain. It most commonly contains some mixture of red wine, chopped fruit, liquor, fruit juice, and sparkling water that is served chilled. But the best part about sangria is there&aposs no one right way to do it. The combinations are truly endless. We&aposll teach you how to make the more traditional red wine version, but we&aposll also give you some fun sangria variation ideas.

1. Wine

Wine is the basis for this summertime punch, so choose one that you would enjoy on its own, but don&apost choose one that&aposs too expensive. Sangria is the perfect way to dress up a bottle of cheap wine.

For a Spanish red wine sangria you&aposll want to choose a wine that&aposs fruity and not too acidic. Some good options include: Garnacha, Rioja, Pinot Noir, Malbec, or Merlot. Avoid high-tannin wines like Cabernet Sauvignon.

2. Fruit

Fruit is not only going to add fresh summer flavor to your sangria, but it&aposs also going to make for a beautiful presentation in your pitcher or punch bowl. That means you&aposll want to choose sturdy fruits that will last a while without disintegrating. Some good options include: oranges, apples, strawberries, peaches, pineapple, pears, and lemons.

3. Spirits

If you&aposre looking to make your sangria a true cocktail, you&aposll of course need to add liquor. Brandy is the most popular choice, but some also use fruit schnapps, rum, or cognac. You can also lower the alcohol content by diluting the sangria with some club soda, or skipping the liquor all together.

4. Sweetener

To round it all out, you can use a sweetener. Some may choose to forego this step, it simply comes down to personal preference. Natural sweeteners like maple syrup, sugar, agave nectar, or simple syrup do best at balancing out sangria without over-sweetening.


Sangria is a type of alcoholic punch originating in Portugal and Spain. It most commonly contains some mixture of red wine, chopped fruit, liquor, fruit juice, and sparkling water that is served chilled. But the best part about sangria is there&aposs no one right way to do it. The combinations are truly endless. We&aposll teach you how to make the more traditional red wine version, but we&aposll also give you some fun sangria variation ideas.

1. Wine

Wine is the basis for this summertime punch, so choose one that you would enjoy on its own, but don&apost choose one that&aposs too expensive. Sangria is the perfect way to dress up a bottle of cheap wine.

For a Spanish red wine sangria you&aposll want to choose a wine that&aposs fruity and not too acidic. Some good options include: Garnacha, Rioja, Pinot Noir, Malbec, or Merlot. Avoid high-tannin wines like Cabernet Sauvignon.

2. Fruit

Fruit is not only going to add fresh summer flavor to your sangria, but it&aposs also going to make for a beautiful presentation in your pitcher or punch bowl. That means you&aposll want to choose sturdy fruits that will last a while without disintegrating. Some good options include: oranges, apples, strawberries, peaches, pineapple, pears, and lemons.

3. Spirits

If you&aposre looking to make your sangria a true cocktail, you&aposll of course need to add liquor. Brandy is the most popular choice, but some also use fruit schnapps, rum, or cognac. You can also lower the alcohol content by diluting the sangria with some club soda, or skipping the liquor all together.

4. Sweetener

To round it all out, you can use a sweetener. Some may choose to forego this step, it simply comes down to personal preference. Natural sweeteners like maple syrup, sugar, agave nectar, or simple syrup do best at balancing out sangria without over-sweetening.


Sangria is a type of alcoholic punch originating in Portugal and Spain. It most commonly contains some mixture of red wine, chopped fruit, liquor, fruit juice, and sparkling water that is served chilled. But the best part about sangria is there&aposs no one right way to do it. The combinations are truly endless. We&aposll teach you how to make the more traditional red wine version, but we&aposll also give you some fun sangria variation ideas.

1. Wine

Wine is the basis for this summertime punch, so choose one that you would enjoy on its own, but don&apost choose one that&aposs too expensive. Sangria is the perfect way to dress up a bottle of cheap wine.

For a Spanish red wine sangria you&aposll want to choose a wine that&aposs fruity and not too acidic. Some good options include: Garnacha, Rioja, Pinot Noir, Malbec, or Merlot. Avoid high-tannin wines like Cabernet Sauvignon.

2. Fruit

Fruit is not only going to add fresh summer flavor to your sangria, but it&aposs also going to make for a beautiful presentation in your pitcher or punch bowl. That means you&aposll want to choose sturdy fruits that will last a while without disintegrating. Some good options include: oranges, apples, strawberries, peaches, pineapple, pears, and lemons.

3. Spirits

If you&aposre looking to make your sangria a true cocktail, you&aposll of course need to add liquor. Brandy is the most popular choice, but some also use fruit schnapps, rum, or cognac. You can also lower the alcohol content by diluting the sangria with some club soda, or skipping the liquor all together.

4. Sweetener

To round it all out, you can use a sweetener. Some may choose to forego this step, it simply comes down to personal preference. Natural sweeteners like maple syrup, sugar, agave nectar, or simple syrup do best at balancing out sangria without over-sweetening.


Sangria is a type of alcoholic punch originating in Portugal and Spain. It most commonly contains some mixture of red wine, chopped fruit, liquor, fruit juice, and sparkling water that is served chilled. But the best part about sangria is there&aposs no one right way to do it. The combinations are truly endless. We&aposll teach you how to make the more traditional red wine version, but we&aposll also give you some fun sangria variation ideas.

1. Wine

Wine is the basis for this summertime punch, so choose one that you would enjoy on its own, but don&apost choose one that&aposs too expensive. Sangria is the perfect way to dress up a bottle of cheap wine.

For a Spanish red wine sangria you&aposll want to choose a wine that&aposs fruity and not too acidic. Some good options include: Garnacha, Rioja, Pinot Noir, Malbec, or Merlot. Avoid high-tannin wines like Cabernet Sauvignon.

2. Fruit

Fruit is not only going to add fresh summer flavor to your sangria, but it&aposs also going to make for a beautiful presentation in your pitcher or punch bowl. That means you&aposll want to choose sturdy fruits that will last a while without disintegrating. Some good options include: oranges, apples, strawberries, peaches, pineapple, pears, and lemons.

3. Spirits

If you&aposre looking to make your sangria a true cocktail, you&aposll of course need to add liquor. Brandy is the most popular choice, but some also use fruit schnapps, rum, or cognac. You can also lower the alcohol content by diluting the sangria with some club soda, or skipping the liquor all together.

4. Sweetener

To round it all out, you can use a sweetener. Some may choose to forego this step, it simply comes down to personal preference. Natural sweeteners like maple syrup, sugar, agave nectar, or simple syrup do best at balancing out sangria without over-sweetening.


Sangria is a type of alcoholic punch originating in Portugal and Spain. It most commonly contains some mixture of red wine, chopped fruit, liquor, fruit juice, and sparkling water that is served chilled. But the best part about sangria is there&aposs no one right way to do it. The combinations are truly endless. We&aposll teach you how to make the more traditional red wine version, but we&aposll also give you some fun sangria variation ideas.

1. Wine

Wine is the basis for this summertime punch, so choose one that you would enjoy on its own, but don&apost choose one that&aposs too expensive. Sangria is the perfect way to dress up a bottle of cheap wine.

For a Spanish red wine sangria you&aposll want to choose a wine that&aposs fruity and not too acidic. Some good options include: Garnacha, Rioja, Pinot Noir, Malbec, or Merlot. Avoid high-tannin wines like Cabernet Sauvignon.

2. Fruit

Fruit is not only going to add fresh summer flavor to your sangria, but it&aposs also going to make for a beautiful presentation in your pitcher or punch bowl. That means you&aposll want to choose sturdy fruits that will last a while without disintegrating. Some good options include: oranges, apples, strawberries, peaches, pineapple, pears, and lemons.

3. Spirits

If you&aposre looking to make your sangria a true cocktail, you&aposll of course need to add liquor. Brandy is the most popular choice, but some also use fruit schnapps, rum, or cognac. You can also lower the alcohol content by diluting the sangria with some club soda, or skipping the liquor all together.

4. Sweetener

To round it all out, you can use a sweetener. Some may choose to forego this step, it simply comes down to personal preference. Natural sweeteners like maple syrup, sugar, agave nectar, or simple syrup do best at balancing out sangria without over-sweetening.


Sangria is a type of alcoholic punch originating in Portugal and Spain. It most commonly contains some mixture of red wine, chopped fruit, liquor, fruit juice, and sparkling water that is served chilled. But the best part about sangria is there&aposs no one right way to do it. The combinations are truly endless. We&aposll teach you how to make the more traditional red wine version, but we&aposll also give you some fun sangria variation ideas.

1. Wine

Wine is the basis for this summertime punch, so choose one that you would enjoy on its own, but don&apost choose one that&aposs too expensive. Sangria is the perfect way to dress up a bottle of cheap wine.

For a Spanish red wine sangria you&aposll want to choose a wine that&aposs fruity and not too acidic. Some good options include: Garnacha, Rioja, Pinot Noir, Malbec, or Merlot. Avoid high-tannin wines like Cabernet Sauvignon.

2. Fruit

Fruit is not only going to add fresh summer flavor to your sangria, but it&aposs also going to make for a beautiful presentation in your pitcher or punch bowl. That means you&aposll want to choose sturdy fruits that will last a while without disintegrating. Some good options include: oranges, apples, strawberries, peaches, pineapple, pears, and lemons.

3. Spirits

If you&aposre looking to make your sangria a true cocktail, you&aposll of course need to add liquor. Brandy is the most popular choice, but some also use fruit schnapps, rum, or cognac. You can also lower the alcohol content by diluting the sangria with some club soda, or skipping the liquor all together.

4. Sweetener

To round it all out, you can use a sweetener. Some may choose to forego this step, it simply comes down to personal preference. Natural sweeteners like maple syrup, sugar, agave nectar, or simple syrup do best at balancing out sangria without over-sweetening.



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